GREEN XMAS
DOCUMENTARY

SYNOPSIS :
In Quebec (Canada), there is a very atypical celebration every July 25: the Camper’s Christmas. During the three days preceding the Camper’s Christmas and until its celebration, we follow five totally different working-class families. Through interviews and set ups revealing typical camping activities, our characters talk about this event celebrating the spirit of Christmas, of childhood and of family.

Pictures

Trailers and excerpts

Production in the media

 Press release(20 kb)
 Press kit (logo + affiche : 328 kb)
 Poster (135 kb)

 Trailer and excerpts

PRESS RELEASE


In Quebec (Canada), there is a very untypical celebration every 25th of July, Camper’s Christmas. During the three days preceding Camper’s Christmas and until it’s celebration, we follow five totally different working class families. Through interviews and set ups revealing the typical activities of camping, our characters talk about this untypical gathering celebrating the spirit of Christmas, of childhood and family.

Camper’s Christmas becomes a pretext to talk about Canada’s family situation. Do we still have the same family values has we did forty years ago? Is it still worthed today to have children? Is it dificult to have a family life in our era? Why do the rich people have fewer children than the less fortunate?

Open-faced, the McBrearty’s, the Wistaff’s, the Descôteaux’s and the Cabral’s discuss their joys and sorrows of their daily lifes. In spite of the vulnerability of the Family, they still believe in it. Just like they hold on to their camper’s Christmas, a gathering that they organise witn enthusiasm year after year, the 25th of July.

But during the three days of preparation for this Green Christmas the forecast is calling for rain. Will Santa Claus’s parade be cancelled? Our families are worried. They even hang their rosaries on the cloches line…

This uncertainty sends us back to the fragility of the family unit. We witness a couple’s separation, the isolation of a retired couple abandoned by their grown up children. Will the Family survive?

Adding up to the bad weather forecast, a family tragedy occures in the neighboring town. At Otterburn Park, the 24th of July, a father murderes his wife and kids. Everybody on the campground comments on this sad event, the worst of all family tragedies. On the front page of the Journal de Montréal, we see a picture of the family on a brighter day, six months earlier, on Christmas eve.

The clouds spared the parade, but the night’s festivities will be under the rain. In spite of the thunder showers, the croud is dancing and singing in the streets. The reunion is touching. The celebration is beautiful.

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Source: Guylaine Maroist
Email: prod@productionsdelaruelle.com
Phone: 514.899.0449

Technical information

French and english version
Length: minutes

Production
Les Productions de la ruelle inc.

Producers
Guylaine Maroist and Éric Ruel

Directors
Guylaine Maroist and Éric Ruel

Voice over
Marcel Sabourin and Justin Benoit

Director of photography
Steeve Desrosiers and Jean-François Perreault

Visuel editing
Éric Ruel

Sound mixing
François Senneville and Éric Ruel

Mixing
Serge Boivin, NFB

Scenario
Guylaine Maroist

Synopsis in details

The McBreartys, the Wistaffs, the Descôteaux and the Cabrals openly discuss the joys and sorrows of their daily lives. Although the idea of the family may be threatened, they still believe in it. Just as they hold on to their Camper’s Christmas, a gathering they organise with enthusiasm, year after year, on July 25.

But as they spend three days preparing for this Green Christmas, the forecast is calling for rain. Will the Santa Claus parade be cancelled? The families are worried. They even hang their rosaries out on the clothes line.

This uncertain faith in the strength of the family unit is echoed by other events. We see a couple break up, and witness the isolation of a retired couple abandoned by their adult children. Will the Family survive?

On top of the bad weather forecast, a family tragedy occurs in the neighbouring town. On July 24, in Otterburn Park, a father murders his wife and children. Everybody on the campground comments on this sad event, the worst of all family tragedies. On the front page of the Journal de Montréal, we see a picture of the family on a happier day, six months earlier, on Christmas Eve.

The holds off for the parade, but the night’s festivities take place in the rain. In spite of the showers, the crowd is dancing and singing outside. The reunion is touching. It’s a beautiful party.


Source: Guylaine Maroist